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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
, for example. we just heard the house republicans are going to try to negotiate a short-term debt ceiling deal so they can try to go for a grand bargain. second-term presidencies have just been spent and filled with misspent political capital that has just overreach in terms of presidents looking for a legacy and overspending their political capital. that's the risk president obama -- >> interesting in this cnn poll that just come out, how is president obama handling his job as president, approve 53%, disapprove 42%. a plus for him. but when they are asked how is the country headed, right direction 35%, wrong direction, 57%. they approve of the president but think he's going completely in the wrong direction. he's a lucky boy, many would argue, that he's gotten a second term, given the state of the economy, given the fact that most americans think the country is going in the wrong direction. he's been given that lucky second chance. and he campaigned well. you have to acknowledge him that. what are his challenges in the second term? >> the first thing every president has to be careful of in a
. they are folding on the debt ceiling. they are hoping the timing will be better to deal with the sequestration with the debt ceiling but that is cosmetics. john is right. the premise of your question is right. this is a party that lost its way, lost its vision, lost its approach and the president is trying --. >>gregg: the president's approval rating is 53 percent and negative 48 percent and that is almost the lowest of any second-term president in six decades. nixon did better than that. however, look at the house of representatives republicans. they are showing disapproval rating at 73 percent. >> they have been perceived at negative, out of touch positions that are not popular. >>gregg: gay rights and tax rights? >> and they fit into the demonization they are protecting the rights of the rich. >> they do not have a pro growth agenda, creating jobs, they do not have a message. >>gregg: and the republican party is out of touch according to six in ten. five in ten, they rank poor on climate change and women's issue. >> there is a center right agenda that is solid majority of the american peopl
to face the tax issue, as well. it's not just raising the debt ceiling that he's going to have to deal with. but he's going to have to negotiate with the republicans and perhaps try to change the tax code. all of these things are things he's already signaled he wants to do. what's fascinating is that this is a president who wanted to be a domestic president in the last -- in his first term and he was saddled with an economic situation and two wars to deal with. now is a shot to be that domestic president and make some really big change. but he's going to have to work with republicans in the house in order to get big things accomplished. >> and clearly what he wants to do is have some influence on voters. and though the official announcement is expected today, we do know that obama for america is going to become this nonprofit supporting his agenda. what kind of influence could this have? >> well, i think if you're an obama supporter, you hope it has more influence than it did or what they tried to do during his first term. they talked a lot about this leveraging his campaign which ever
with republicans on the hill after the debt ceiling negotiation back in 2011. for that reason and others, his confirmation hearing could be bumpy. if confirmed, he will be dealing with the top issue in this second term, how to get the economy moving and addressing the country's long term fiscal problems. >> this is a president that is forced to grapple with the budget woes, with the economy that cannot get over the hump. it will consume most of his time, i believe, in the second term. >> what he cannot do going into the term is go from economic crisis to economic crisis. that is not leadership. he has to figure out how to address this in ay way. our health care reform cannot waste, must not wait and will not wait another year. >> passing health care legislation early on was high on the president's to-do list. he picked kansas governor to head up health and human services, to get health care legislation done he largely passed control over to congress to put the bill together and to figure out how to get it through. it became a messy process about 2,000-plus-page bill. it did pass. it was signe
the way he is handling the debt ceiling, i think he understands that he has a lot of high cards he is going to play those, and the republicans are in some disarray here. tom cole in the house leadership say half the republicans voted against the fiscal cliff deal secretly hoped it passed. we've entered a new kind of framework. guns are a different story. it's going to be tough, maybe impossible to pass all the different stuff the president proposed, and some like the background checks, 90% of americans are for them. nra numbers are for them. one really big thing is happening. the old line that this is about conphysician cat iing people's guns taking guns away from hunters has been opposed because this has been too vivid a tragedy, and the president has been so swift and so clear. >> and anybody who goes back and looks at the heller case, the d.c. gun case, knows that the supreme court has made it very clear this is want about confiscating your guns, but some restrictions on military weapons are quite legal and constitutional. >> they have to be. looking in the 1930s we had a big pr
but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of their three-day retreat saying they have a better chance of reaching their goal of broad spending cuts. and that means not making the demand in the next few weeks, which is exactly what it would mean because, according to most economists, we will hit that debt ceiling mid-february. >> so here's the question, bottom line, is is this a sure thing? will congress actually vote to raise the debt limit next week? >> well, there is a catch. the house gop, the leadership at least says what they are going to try to pass next week would raise the debt ceiling for three months but with a condition. and that would be that the house and senate pass budgets. it may seem simple but house republicans like to point out that they haven't passed a bu
's some type of deal on not slamming-- or raising the debt ceiling, just the tone, jay carney saying he's encouraged and the republicans trying to beat a deadline and things might be different. >> sure, i don't think anyone in this town is under any illusion, and magically the republicans and democrats are coming together and solve all of these big problems and singing kumbayah. but there are a host of things where they want to come together and find some common ground and the debt ceiling might be one of them, but the republicans have some caveats to that and want to make sure that the senate democrats pass a budget. something they haven't done in the last four years and put some heat on the democrats right there. even as both sides are talking about coming together on some of this, there's going to be an edge to it as well. let's not forget the president is still dealing with high unemployment. and wants to focus on gun control, immigration reform and get those done in the second term and still got things left over from the first term. stubbornly high unemployment said he's going to c
sides when it comes to president and congress, this debt ceiling fight. >> that's right. although now we're seeing some of the temperatures lower there because every was expecting for this to be during the last time out, republicans saying let's deal with this for the next three mos, deal with the longer one later. the white house encouraged -- they're encouraged by what they're hearing but clearly it's not going to be easy. but certainly i think not as contentious as we were thinking in the short term. >> we'll see how that relationship develops if at all or e vovls throughout the next term. dan, thanks very much. john has some of the other headlines this hour. >>> including the manti te'o story. twists and turns if that mysterious case of the notre dame linebacker and his fictitious girlfriend. notre dame linebacker says he was the victim of a cruel hoax. he spoke off kacamera with espn jeremy schaap and said as recently as last wednesday he believed his girlfriend was real person even know he never met her. schaap says he seemed believable and sincere throughout the interview. >> i ca
with our spending. how do you square that with this very specific debt ceiling problem that we have, that we have financial obligations that we've already made that need to be paid and we have a second debate going on about how we should spend our money? >> basically, ali, we have 100% leveraged. $16.5 trillion in debt. if we continue to borrow and spend beyond our limit, we're going to compound that debt and deficit and be on an us sustainable course for us to survive. we're at a point, we need to take the one less traveled and make all the difference. we're going to have to put our talking points on and leave them outside of the room. >> yes. >> sit down at the table, prioritize our spending, act like a business person would have to act and every family member has to act and we're going to get our house in order. we don't do that, we're going to be a deader state. >> you want to get business done. you want to get a budget. can can we not separate these things out? i know there are a lot of people who take the debt ceiling off the table and increase it and you lose your leverage. r
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)